What is a trust deed

What is a trust deed

A trust deed is a formal document that outlines the detailed terms expressed within a trust agreement. A trust agreement is established to protect the assets of an individual or company. It usually involves large portions of wealth and is protected by a legally binding deed, or trust deed.

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Features of a trust deed

A trust deed is a document that is drawn up to detail the specific wishes of the founder. Each deed is unique in that it outlines the exact requirements of the owner, including the duration of the trust.

A trust deed involves three legal parties: the settlor, the trustee and the beneficiaries. If desired, a protector can also be appointed. The settlor is the individual or party who has chosen to establish the trust; the trustee is responsible for managing and administering the provisions within the deed, and the beneficiary is the individual or party who will benefit from the trust. In addition, if a protector is appointed, it is their responsibility to ensure that the trustee’s are administering the trust in accordance with the settlor’s wishes.

A trust deed essentially enables the owner to transfer property and other assets for the benefit of someone else. These assets are governed by a third party, who manages and distributes the assets as described in the trust deed. The deed is tailored to the exact requirements of the founder.

A trust is an excellent way to protect one’s assets, whether that is for the protection of bank deposits, real estate or other forms of wealth.

The exact structure of the trust itself is dependent upon the jurisdiction under which it is established. These terms are usually written down in the trust deed. The trust deed must clearly elucidate the specific wishes of its owner. The trustee is required to administer the trust based upon these wishes, as well as the governing jurisdiction under which it is established.